“Assault is not an accident”

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A victim of sexual assault read a letter to her attacker.


June 6, 2016

An NPR photographer and a translator were killed while on assignment in Afghanistan. Donald Trump said no Latino or Muslim judges should be allowed to hear any cases against him. And remembering boxing legend and 20th-century icon Muhammad Ali, who died on Friday.

Here are the top stories

Remembering Muhammad Ali

The former heavyweight boxing champion died on Friday from septic shock. He was 74.

Perhaps the world’s most iconic athlete, Ali has been remembered as much for his transcendent athletic ability as he has been for the way he unapologetically embraced his identity as a black Muslim man. He did more for Muslims in the U.S. than any other individual of his time, community leaders told BuzzFeed News.  

“Muhammad Ali shook up the world,” U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama said “And the world is better for it. We are all better for it.”

Here are the greatest and most memorable fights of Ali’s career, how he wanted to be remembered, and how newspapers around the world mourned Ali’s death.

Muhammad Ali stands over fallen challenger Sonny Liston in Maine, 1965.

Muhammad Ali stands over fallen challenger Sonny Liston in Maine, 1965.

John Rooney / AP

NPR photojournalist David Gilkey and translator Zabihullah Tamanna were killed Sunday while on assignment in Afghanistan.

Gilkey was the first civilian American journalist to be killed in Afghanistan since U.S. military involvement began in 2001, according to records kept by the Committee to Protect Journalists, BuzzFeed News’ Claudia Koerner reports. Tamanna and Gilkey were traveling with an Afghan army unit when their convoy came under fire. Two other NPR journalists in their group were unharmed.

Zabihullah Tamanna (left) and David Gilkey

Zabihullah Tamanna (left) and David Gilkey

Monika Evstatieva / NPR

For the latest news and updates, download the BuzzFeed News app for iOS and Android (available in Canadian, UK, Australian, and U.S. app stores).

Here’s the powerful letter a sexual assault victim read to her attacker.  

A former Stanford University swimmer who sexually assaulted an unconscious woman was sentenced to six months in jail because a longer sentence would have “a severe impact on him,” according to a judge. At his sentencing on Thursday, his victim read him a letter describing the “severe impact” the assault had on her. The woman, now 23, told BuzzFeed News she was disappointed with the “gentle” sentence and angry that the attacker still denied sexually assaulting her.

“Your damage was concrete; stripped of titles, degrees, enrollment. My damage was internal, unseen, I carry it with me,” she told the attacker. Read the full letter here.

And a little extra.

Last week, actor Amber Heard was granted a restraining order against her estranged husband, Johnny Depp, claiming he had verbally and physically abused her during their 15-month marriage. The allegations have pushed the issue of domestic violence into the spotlight, and the public reaction to them tells a story of its own about the experience of anyone who claims they’ve been a victim of domestic abuse, BuzzFeed News’ Rossalyn Warren writes.

Quick things to know:

  • 2016 U.S. presidential election: Donald Trump said no Latino or Muslim judges should be allowed to hear any cases against him because they could be biased. (BuzzFeed News) And black Democrats want to see bigger and earlier voter turnout efforts from the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee. (BuzzFeed News)

  • Extreme weather: At least three people have died after the worst storm in decades hit Australia’s east coast. (BuzzFeed News) The levels of the Seine River in Paris reached a 34-year high on Friday after heavy rain across Europe. The Louvre and the Orsay museums closed as staff evacuated artworks. (BBC News)

  • Tech news: Twitter has created new emojis to remind young people to register to vote in the June 23 referendum on Britain’s European Union membership. (BuzzFeed News) Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s Twitter and Pinterest accounts were hacked. His password was reported to be “dadada.” (BuzzFeed News)

  • French Open: Novak Djokovic beat Andy Murray to win his first French Open yesterday. He’s now collected all four Grand Slam titles. (BBC News) Spain’s Garbiñe Muguruza won the women’s title — her first Grand Slam — after beating Serena Williams. (New York Times)

  • Ramadan: The month in which Muslims around the world fast from dusk to dawn, kicks off today. Here are nine questions about Ramadan you’re too embarrassed to ask. (BuzzFeed News

Did you hear about this?

From Beyoncé to YouTube: Somali-British poets reveal their inspiration.

When Beyoncé’s Lemonade premiered, not only did the unapologetically black and female hourlong video album launch a thousand thinkpieces dissecting its meaning, it also drew attention to Warsan Shire, a 27-year-old Somali-British poet whose words are laced throughout. But the UK is home to many other young Somali-British poets who are keeping the lyrical oral tradition of their ancestors alive. Here are five you need to know about.

When you’re performing, you’re giving people such personal information. —Fatima Diriye

“When you’re performing, you’re giving people such personal information.” —Fatima Diriye

Matthew Tucker / BuzzFeed

This letter was edited and brought to you by Natasha Japanwala and Claire Moses. You can always reach us here.  

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